Higher truth

Introduction

Having become increasingly aware of the limitations of critical thinking, I’ve taken time out to reflect on how best to proceed on my journey of discovery.

Over the first 60 years of my life, I learned to “play the system” of the current political economy with variable success but remained, for most of those years, in a state of Trained Ignorance, as described in How We Live. Public and private education take us on a linear journey of learning through prescribed curricular, abstraction, erroneous assumptions and binary logic, which obscures the subtleties, ambiguities and contradictions in life and how everything is connected.

Abrupt changes in my life in the mid 1990’s started me on a journey of learning but I continued to “play the system” as best as I could.

However, as draconian limits were imposed on our freedom, due to the geopolitical and social upheaval, following the false flag attacks on 11th September 2001, I realised that everything I thought I knew couldn’t be relied on and needed to be questioned. The reality gap between my previous convictions and my lived reality fuelled my thirst for understanding.

Having explored the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the realisation that our governments and institutions are complicit in murder and duplicity to the extent of what unfolded from that day in September 2001, was both shocking and frightening. It did not, however, stem my curiosity which was largely driven by outrage and disbelief.

Prompted by a friend, in 2009, I eventually started to explore man-made global warming which I’d hitherto had no reason to doubt. However, within a few short weeks of research, my “belief” in the alleged “man-made global warming” consensus quickly evaporated. My scepticism has increased since, as accumulating evidence highlights the mismatch between the perceptions and reality of climate change.

The subprime crisis prompted investigation both into the causes of the crisis and the banking and monetary system itself. Imagine my surprise to find that everything I’d learned, during my years in finance, economics and investment management, was questionable, at best.

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Let go

Ken and I met at Occupy and got to know each other through Critical Thinking which started at the Bank of Ideas. Ken recently emailed this extract from Facebook and asked what I thought of this article and the video: Windows on the World INSIDE OCCUPY AND BANK OF IDEAS.

Confession: while I encountered resistance and hostility when sharing information on climate science at Occupy and had reservations about some of the “facilitation” and the obsession with consensus, I wasn’t sufficiently “aware” to realise Occupy was a PSYOP. In retrospect, it’s hard to refute Kelfin’s and Dom’s assertions. More importantly, Occupy has paved the way for another PSYOP, Extinction Rebellion (XR); was that Occupy’s purpose all along?

Not only has XR attracted similar followers; it uses the same Common Purpose, NLP, Delphi and mind control techniques. XR is “controlled opposition”. Not least because it’s not opposing (or rebelling against) anything! XR’s agenda is in lock-step with that of corporate greenwash and the new world order backed by every corrupt institution, including big oil. The “climate crisis” (from global warming) has been manufactured and has no basis in fact. The reality is that we’re entering a solar minimum which could herald another Little Ice Age.

Systemic Risk and Climate ChangeWhat if the claimed consensus is wrong?

What is apparent, in both Occupy and XR, irrespective of protestations to the contrary, is hierarchy and it is all the more insidious through being obscured by lies and deception.

What both Occupy and XR aspire to is scale, ie. mass “protest”, and that’s really the point; to create or accelerate momentum for change through mass movements which aren’t spontaneous or “grass roots” but carefully infiltrated, choreographed and orchestrated.

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The power of co-creative learning

A couple of endorsements of Critical Thinking’s analysis from Twitter

What is paramount in co-creative learning is its collaborative nature, drawing and building on the work of many others. Critical Thinking’s conclusions are the culmination of millions of man hours, worked by hundreds of thousands of people, shared by thousands more and filtered through the Critical Thinking community to be re-shared via email, the website, conversations, books, articles, videos, podcasts and Twitter. Critical Thinking’s motto is:

Thus no individual or group can claim “ownership” of what Critical Thinking has produced – knowledge is one of the most important commons. Theft of the commons is one of the three fundamental flaws in the political economy.

Critical Thinking urges us to plagiarise.

Knowledge is not to be held secret and rationed out to the privileged but is our birthright denied us by the political economy. Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) don’t exist to reward creators but to perpetuate ignorance and the abusive and destructive political economy.

Among those who’ve contributed to Critical Thinking’s work are some who “get it”, ie. are pretty much “on board” with its conclusions. There are others who are at a different place on their own journey of discovery and have yet to see the whole picture of the political economy.

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Beyond Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking at the Free University has just published the 7th and final iteration of its accumulated research and analysis of political economy, How we live – who rules, how and why?, which explains:

we are at a crossroads and faced with a choice; the choice will differ depending on where people are on their personal journey of discovery. Many have yet to reach the limits of critical thinking in exploring political economy to realise that there lies a world of possibilities beyond;

– events are coming to a head; dramatic changes to the fabric of global society are accelerating. The “powers that shouldn’t be” are preparing for the Cull.

How we live – Who rules, how and why? at archive.org

Below is the Abstract of the final iteration:

Abstract
Purpose: Challenging outdated and erroneous assumptions that govern most people’s world views. To reveal the world as it is, rather than how “authority” would have us believe it to be.
Design/methodology/approach: This paper is the product of non-hierarchical, self- organised, co-creative learning; exploring the world from multiple perspectives.
Findings: Institutions which govern our lives are inherently corrupt, having been created, infiltrated and co-opted for the purpose of our subjugation and enslavement. The currently political economy farms humans and harvests the wealth they create for the benefit of a small number of individuals and their families. Farming of humans has a long history and we are approaching the apogee of centralised power which plans the total submission of humanity to its will and population reduction to optimise land and resources for the exclusive use of the “farmers”.
Research limitations/implications: Ideological and institutional blindness have obscured the reality of our existence.
Practical implications: We are shackled by our beliefs and misconceptions; when we understand the reality of our condition, we have the means to change that reality because we are the power or fuel of the political economy.
Social implications: Armed with a shared understanding of reality, we can shed our deference to “authority” and cease to abdicate responsibility for ourselves and each other to unreliable representatives and corrupt hierarchies. Self-organisation trumps “command and control” which is easily subverted for selfish ends.
Originality/value: Orthodox academia and media present a false picture of reality by design, based on abstracted data/information and erroneous assumptions. Co-creative learning reveals the nature of reality by looking at events and issues from multiple perspectives, exposing how everything is connected; little happens in the world by accident. There is a plan and Critical Thinking’s research and analysis reveals it.

How we live – Who rules, how and why? at freecriticalthinking.org

This work, started at Outersite.org, continued at freecriticalthinking.org from January 2012 until 18th October 2019. Having met the boundaries of Critical Thinking, the journey of discovery will continue here, until another co-creative learning project emerges, to take over from where Critical Thinking ceased to add to the archive of material which supports the conclusions of its research and analysis. That material remains accessible at freecriticalthinking.org.

Critical Thinking also has a BitChute channel with selected videos preserved from YouTube censorship.

Critical Thinking at the Free University

Posted 26th January 2014

Only from the weight of evidence provided by comparative study of many information sources, can one hope to reach a convincing conclusion.

Born of the Bank of Ideas and the Occupy movement, Critical Thinking is a collaborative research project to understand contemporary affairs in the context of financial markets, commerce, media, government and public institutions. It is a process by which we are continuously learning and refining our world view in the light of new information – learning never ceases. The narrative is never settled.

The work of Outersite.org continues at http://freecriticalthinking.org

The Century of the Self

Posted 30th November 2013

Edward Bernays sold America’s entry into WW1 on a message of spreading freedom and democracy (a practice followed by US administrations ever since). He persuaded women that cigarettes were a penile symbol of power and aligned smoking with the suffragette movement.

The same techniques are used today to sell wars, economic repression and the theory of man-made global warming which survives in the face of historical experience and contemporary observation.

Our world view has been choreographed through concentrated media (particularly the BBC). Anyone who missed The Century of the Self (which is, ironically a BBC production), would be well advised to watch it. It explains how our decisions are no longer based on rational thought but appeals to emotion and base instincts.

Bernays’ uncle Siegmund Freud was concerned with the study of individuals. Bernays was focused and grew rich on manipulating the masses.