Why The Great Reset Won’t Work

Three days ago, I wrote of the current war between the centralised control agenda, aka. The Great Reset, and distributed autonomous organisation (DAO), i.e. an atomising, dehumanising agenda versus the co-creative development of a self-organising political economy of miraculous abundance. The primary “front” in this war is money. The Great Reset is seeking to record … Read more

Protest and Principled Pragmatism

Having attended the Trafalgar Square, London rally on 29th August 2020 and yesterday’s event for the first couple of hours and having watched the Ruptly.TV livestream of both yesterday and the 19th September event which I didn’t attend, I’ve been reflecting on the effectiveness of protest. Turning out to show the world that there are … Read more

Idiocracy Exposed

Listen to Max Igan; he articulates what more and more people are recognising: “COVID is an intelligence test” and if we’ve “passed” the test, we have a choice to make. WHAT ARE YOU SO AFRAID OF? [YOU WERE BORN FOR THIS] — Max IganTruth teller Max Igan joins me to discuss that which shall not … Read more

Contributions from David Graeber

David Graeber is no longer with us in the flesh. Anthropologist David Graeber, the man behind ‘We are the 99%’ slogan, dead at 59An anthropology professor at London School of Economics, Graeber was known for his books criticizing and deconstructing the capitalist system, including ‘Debt: the First 5000 Years,’ ‘Bulls*** Jobs: a Theory,’ and ‘The … Read more

Ecology, Climate and Hope

This conversation between Gordon of Rune Soup and Charles Eisenstein begins to unpack conflation of the polarised climate debate with the very real damage we continue to inflict on our habitat and ourselves.

Talking Ecology, Climate and Hope with Charles Eisenstein
Charles is the author of a number of important books including Sacred Economics and The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible. He joins us today to talk about his most recent book, Climate: A New Story.
Along the way we tackle many challenging and thorny topics, such as solutionism, polarisation, despair and how to best think with our ecological crisis so that we may return to flourishing.

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Water of Life

Water is pretty much taken for granted in the UK, except when there’s a hosepipe ban in high summer. We regard it as ubiquitous and mundane but as water has become privatised, metered and rationed around the world, its significance is beginning to penetrate popular consciousness. The cost of water is accelerating – at 20% per annum over the last three years in London (Thames Water is owned by an Australian consortium led by Macquarie Group).

But water has magical properties which not even those who steal it from the rest of us for profit understand. To them, it is merely another God or nature given commodity to be exploited for private gain. Water is a commons and arguably one of the most important but, beyond that, its properties could be harnessed for everyone’s benefit and the environment, in a world that was less focused on profit and competition.

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Democracy Illusion

Apologies. When I tried to find the following joke, I failed and made a poor attempt at retelling it. The intrepid Maggie found it for me and credit goes to Critical Thinker, Roger, who forwarded the joke. The original joke came from David Stevenson to whom I owe an even bigger apology for bastardising the original. So here it is, as told by David:

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Trapped

Contained within the third iteration of Critical Thinking’s analysis of political economy, published in January 2015, was the following image:

That was three years into our journey of discovery, since when the observations recorded in that iteration have been refined/sharpened and our understanding of the human condition has expanded.

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Gulag Academia

A study of the effect of hierarchy on academic freedom and our consequent perceptions of reality has been uploaded to archive.org and is available as a PDF here.

Abstract

Purpose: Exposing the deficiencies of institutional hierarchies in academia which limit the potential for human creativity and understanding.

Design/methodology/approach: This paper is the product of non-hierarchical, self-organised learning following the methodology of CoCreative Learning (see Section 9).

Findings: Academia’s institutional hierarchy perpetuates ignorance of the current political economy which functions as a mechanism to farm humans and harvest the wealth they create.

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Beyond Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking at the Free University has just published the 7th and final iteration of its accumulated research and analysis of political economy, How we live – who rules, how and why?, which explains:

we are at a crossroads and faced with a choice; the choice will differ depending on where people are on their personal journey of discovery. Many have yet to reach the limits of critical thinking in exploring political economy to realise that there lies a world of possibilities beyond;

– events are coming to a head; dramatic changes to the fabric of global society are accelerating. The “powers that shouldn’t be” are preparing for the Cull.

How we live – Who rules, how and why? at archive.org

Below is the Abstract of the final iteration:

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