Ecology, Climate and Hope

This conversation between Gordon of Rune Soup and Charles Eisenstein begins to unpack conflation of the polarised climate debate with the very real damage we continue to inflict on our habitat and ourselves.

Talking Ecology, Climate and Hope with Charles Eisenstein
Charles is the author of a number of important books including Sacred Economics and The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible. He joins us today to talk about his most recent book, Climate: A New Story.
Along the way we tackle many challenging and thorny topics, such as solutionism, polarisation, despair and how to best think with our ecological crisis so that we may return to flourishing.

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Think Context

Critical Thinking’s research and analysis revealed the limitations of abstraction which is how most people derive their understanding of the world – abstraction is how we’ve been trained to manage complexity, ie. if we are considering a complex issue or event, we’re wont to isolate the elements we can grasp or appreciate to focus on these to derive our opinions or views; often what we choose to abstract to justify our world view is determined by our ideological perspectives. Thus we ignore “inconvenient” evidence or information as irrelevant or wrong because it doesn’t “fit” with our world view. Furthermore, we tend to dismiss information from sources outside our cultural comfort zone, ie. from those with whom we feel we have little in common.

In the last post, I referred to how we’ve been trained out of our human essence to become aspiring consumers – in other words, we’ve been isolated from our fundamental context as individuals interacting with other individuals to form human bonds of common interest mandated by universal consciousness – we have lost the middle ground; as Laurie Anderson explains:

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Beyond Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking at the Free University has just published the 7th and final iteration of its accumulated research and analysis of political economy, How we live – who rules, how and why?, which explains:

we are at a crossroads and faced with a choice; the choice will differ depending on where people are on their personal journey of discovery. Many have yet to reach the limits of critical thinking in exploring political economy to realise that there lies a world of possibilities beyond;

– events are coming to a head; dramatic changes to the fabric of global society are accelerating. The “powers that shouldn’t be” are preparing for the Cull.

How we live – Who rules, how and why? at archive.org

Below is the Abstract of the final iteration:

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